Puyo Puyo DA!

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Puyo Puyo DA!
Screenshot PuyoPuyoDA Title.png
Title Screen
DeveloperCompile
PublisherCompile
PlatformsArcade, Dreamcast
ModesSingle Player, Multi Player
Players1-2 players
Release dateDreamcast
Japan December 16, 1999

Arcade

Japan December 26, 1999

Puyo Puyo DA! is a Dance Dance Revolution based game for the Dreamcast with Puyo Puyo characters. This game is based off a Disc Station game previously featuring Ellena Stevens.

In contrast to most Puyo Puyo games, a large majority of the text in this game is in English.

It was Compile's last Puyo Puyo game to be released on a Sega system. (The last Compile game in the series, Puyo Puyo Box, released a year later.)

Gameplay

Puyo Puyo DA! plays very similarly to games like Space Channel 5, PaRappa the Rapper, and the second stage of Pokemon Diamond/Pearl/Platinum's Pokemon Contest. It uses four directional buttons and an action button, in three different layouts. With Type A, the directional buttons are mapped to both the D-pad and face buttons, while the action button is mapped to L and R. Type B maps the D-pad to the action button, while Type C maps the face buttons to action. The game is somewhat turn-based; the opponent lays out a pattern of buttons to the music, and the player must copy the pattern. Depending on the timing of your button presses, there is a rating, going from Bad to Fair, Good, Great, and Excellent. Great and Excellent ratings will create Chains, although skipping a button press will still count. Thus, if you press all buttons in a combo, but most are Good or lower, you will get less a lower Chain than the other person. There is also a "Nori Nori" gauge that decreases with terrible play. Once it's empty, the player automatically loses. Chains send Garbage Puyo to the opponent, just like in the main series, and when the song ends, the person with Garbage Puyo on their side loses.

Characters

There are 8 characters in this game, each with their own difficulty mode. All of the Puyo characters have been redesigned for the game.

  • Arle wears a gray beanie, a black, yellow, and red hoodie, a pair of jeans, and tennis shoes. There is also a chain on her jeans.
  • Ellena Stevens is the star of the game Puyo Puyo Da is based on.
  • Suketoudara wears a ballet-inspired outfit, including a tutu and ballet shoes.
  • Schezo wears a flamenco-like outfit, and carries a pair of maracas.
  • Rulue wears a crop tank top, a crop jacket, a skirt, and boots. This outfit is entirely black.
  • Satan wears a fishnet tank top, jeans like Arle's, dress shoes, and a pair of glasses. He also has ear piercings.
  • Minotauros wears a yellow hoodie, sunglasses, jeans, and tennis shoes.
  • Skeleton T has a green beanie, tennis shoes, and fingerless gloves.

Songs

There are 8 different songs in this game, 1 per character. Here are the songs along with the name of the character they are associated with:

Character Song
Arle Shakunetsu no Fire Dance(Edit)
Skeleton T Puyopuyo(DA Original Remix)
Suketoudara I miss you
Ellena I sing
Minotauros Hip House Compile Classix'95
Schezo toy of puyopuyo(morphing 727 mix)
Satan I hate you(hanglish version)
Rulue memories of puyopuyo(euro version)

Trivia

  • Toy of Puyo Puyo and Memories of Puyo Puyo are taken from the CD Bayoeen - The Mega Tracks of Puyo Puyo CD.
  • The characters are mostly redesigned with a more hip-hop style in mind, except for two; Schezo, who wears a flamenco-styled outfit, and Suketoudara, who wears a ballet outfit.
  • One of the game's main marketing points was the fact that the characters were in 3D for the first time. 3D-modeled characters would not be used again, until the release of Puyo Puyo Chronicle on the Nintendo 3DS.
  • The game bears somewhat of a resemblance to Space Channel 5, another game for the Sega Dreamcast. Similarly, some Sega-era Puyo Puyo games have a Puyo skin based on the Morolians, a race of aliens from the Space Channel 5 series.
  • This game is based on Disc Station title Broadway Legend Ellena, where Ellena must copy the other dancer's moves. Ellena is not rhythm-based like *DA!* is, however.